BFF’s: How To Naturally Build A Friendship With Your Audience Online

21 Apr

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If you’re familiar with this blog or have even used any social media platform (if you have an internet connection there’s a 93% chance you have a social media profile, or have visited one at some point,) you’ll know that business profiles can be found throughout them all. What’s not taken as much for granted though, is the ability to engage, and most importantly build a rapport with your potential clientele.

There are a few methods to break through this barrier. The main one being humor. It’s absolutely the case that a talented graphic design department can draw eyes, but keeping hold of them and directing them to the body of text that explains what you’re all about is another challenge entirely.

Keeping a humorous, light and buddy-buddy attitude to the text you are writing will help break through the fourth wall. Customers online, especially through social media know when they’re being sold to, so anything you can do to draw awareness to that and reassure them you plan to make this interaction as natural as possible is a great way of gathering respect.

It’s also been proven that smart humor is the most ‘liked’ or ‘followed’ subject on the top three social media websites. Utilise this. Keep in mind that even if a customer doesn’t agree with your brand, or has no use for it, a smartly written observation about your company, or something that makes light of the whole process could just achieve that sought-after ‘like.’ If a customer likes something, their friends will see it. This is invaluable.

Take Facebook for example. A personal page has a friends list limit of 5000. That is up to 5000 people you could be exposed to, in exchange for one smart, witty post that it cost you nothing to write. This would be an advertisers dream in the past, so make sure that you’re doing everything you can to integrate it into your marketing strategy.

Of course, discretion is advised. Writing the best, crowd levelling joke every hour will alienate some people. Strike a balance between real, interesting information and humor. Strike the fine line between professionalism and seeming human. Much like you’d introduce yourself to the colleague who was just placed at the desk next to you at work. Once this rapport is established, consider using Postman newsletter software to carry on the focus on brand personality to their email.

I’d recommend conducting your own personal experiment at this point. Have a look at some business social media profiles you’re aware of online. Try and find some you think would have a humorous attitude to what they do, and judge how many ‘likes’ their posts gain. Next, look for a profile that has complete seriousness and has adopted a straight-laced marketing strategy. See how there’s little positive client interaction? The complaints to the social media profile’s public timeline are likely more biting also.

Customers want to know how they should interact with your company, even when complaining, and getting spoken to in a way that makes light of the whole process will soften the communication on their end. A parallel can be drawn to calling a company. Your thoughts of the company greatly differ dependent on how the employee in the call centre interacts with you. Adopt this axiom of human psychology today to make your business stand out from all the others. Just make sure you have someone genuinely witty writing the posts, and make sure the marketing team approves it will be universally understood.

You’ll be way on your way to changing your marketing effectiveness, with zero cost.

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